COMMON CORE STANDARDS DAILY UPDATE // MAY 27, 2016

News You Can Use:

 

Texas’ Math Standards Look Suspiciously Familiar / Slate

Although Texas never adopted the Common Core State Standards (in fact, lawmakers went so far as to outlaw the adoption or use of the standard), “the standards here are pretty similar,” experts say. “The common research base [of what students need to know and how they learn best] has resulted in a lot more similarities than differences between Common Core state and states such as Texas and Nebraska that never adopted the standards,” the article notes. Last year Karen Nussle wrote, “It is virtually impossible to produce a set of K-12 academic standards that both bear no resemblance to Common Core, and adequately prepare students for college and career.” That’s because the standards build on the best evidence of what students need to learn and do to become college and career ready.


 

Correcting the Record:

 

Education Elite Doubles Down on Common Core / The American Spectator

Changes to classroom instruction happening under Common Core State Standards obstruct “students’ development of long-term working memory,” impairing deeper learning, claims Emmett Tyrrell. “Common Core’s progressive pedagogy is especially harmful to disadvantaged students,” the piece argues. “Common Core math locks students into a slowed-down progression that will leave them unprepared for higher education…The result? An expanding achievement gap.” In actuality, Common Core State Standards have enabled states to begin raising classroom proficiency targets for all students, which will likely help to close achievement gaps in the long run. Here is where Tyrrell gets it wrong:

Correcting the Record: Common Core State Standards Don’t ‘Obstruct’ Student Learning. In Fact, They’ve Helped States Raise Expectations

 

Changes to classroom instruction happening under Common Core State Standards obstruct “students’ development of long-term working memory,” impairing deeper learning, claims Emmett Tyrrell, writing on the American Spectator.

 

“Common Core’s progressive pedagogy is especially harmful to disadvantaged students,” the piece argues. “Common Core math locks students into a slowed-down progression that will leave them unprepared for higher education…The result? An expanding achievement gap.”

 

Tyrrell points to a recent Hechinger Report article, which says, in part, “It’s clear that raising standards was not enough to help all learners.” However, it’s unfair to suggest the Common Core is responsible for academic achievement gaps. High, consistent learning goals ensure all students are held to expectations designed to fully prepare them for college and careers, which is an important first step to begin improving student outcomes.

 

Towards that end, the Hechinger Report article acknowledges Common Core State Standards have helped to raise classroom expectations. The Common Core has “ramped up academic expectations,” the article notes, and the standards are “tougher” and require a “deeper level of inquiry.”


 

On Our Reading List:

 

GOP Slams New Obama Education Rules / The Hill

After the U.S. Department of Education released proposed accountability regulations under the Every Student Succeeds Act on Thursday, Republican lawmakers criticized the proposed rules as shifting school oversight from state and local communities to the federal government. “I am deeply concerned the Department is trying to take us back to the days when Washington dictated national education policy,” said Congressman John Kline, chairman of the House education committee. Senator Lamar Alexander, chairman of the Senate education committee, added, “I am disappointed that the draft regulation seems to include provisions that the Congress considered—and expressly rejected.”

Kirsten Baesler Gathers Teacher Input on Replacing Common Core Standards / Grand Forks Herald

North Dakota state superintendent Kirsten Baesler says she wants to ensure teachers have a say in the development of new standards to replace the Common Core. “We can set high goals and high expectations for our students and achieve them for all students because we have committed teachers,” Baesler told the Grand Forks Herald editorial board. “We shouldn’t be afraid of setting high expectations for our students.” Earlier this month Baesler announced state officials would develop new learning goals to replace the Common Core. She later said the process could build on the Common Core framework and that the “six years [teachers] have spent…is not a waste.”