COMMON CORE STANDARDS DAILY UPDATE // JUNE 3, 2016

News You Can Use:

 

Students Win: Common Core Shakeup Gets an ‘A’ / Staten Island Advance

This year New York education officials made changes to state assessments, including shorting both the math and English language arts sections, giving student more time and putting a moratorium on using the results in student assessments. The upshot, the editorial board writes, is “vibrant, creative, energetic learning with high standards that go far beyond the grade on a particular test.” New York’s challenging assessments, and policymakers’ commitment to getting them right, has enabled to the state to achieve honest proficiency rates that closely mirror NAEP. This year a chorus of supporters urged families to opt-in to the state’s exams. ““It’s time for everyone to get past the mistakes and work together to give students the education they need,” Newsday wrote last month.


 

Correcting the Record:

 

Standardized Testing Put to the Test

Boston Globe

Nearly all the literature on student assessments is “inimical to the acronym-ical,” claims Katherine Whittemore, suggesting experts believe annual assessments do as much harm as good. “Such tests foster homogeneity and discourage intrinsic motivation and innovation,” Whittemore argues, drawing comparisons between the testing culture in China and that in the United States—the latter of which she calls a “Trojan horse.” However, high-quality assessments are one of the best tools parents and teachers have to measure student development and to provide support where students need it. Here is where Whittemore gets it wrong:

High-Quality Student Assessments Empower Learning, Not Impair It

 

Citing four books that criticize student testing, Katherine Whittemore claims “almost all” the literature on assessments is “inimical to the acronym-ical”—suggesting experts roundly believe annual assessments do more harm than good.

 

“Such tests foster homogeneity and discourage intrinsic motivation and innovation,” Whittemore argues, drawing comparisons between the testing culture in China and that in the United States—the latter of which she calls a “Trojan horse.”

 

In fact, high-quality assessments are one of the best tools parents and teachers have to measure student development and to provide support where students need it.

 


 

On Our Reading List:

 

PARCC Testing Comes to a Close

Politico Pro

PARCC testing will wrap up nationwide a week from today, and by the end of the school year 3.5 million students will have participate in the exams. Ninety percent of students took the exam electronically. The testing window was “smooth…particularly as some computer-based tests outside of the PARCC Consortium have experienced setbacks,” says Laura Slover, the organization’s CEO. Seven states, Washington, DC, and the Bureau of Indian Education administered PARCC assessments this year.