COMMON CORE STANDARDS DAILY UPDATE // JUNE 24, 2016

News You Can Use:

Higher Standards Begin with More Training for Instructors / The 74 Million
Contrary to opponents’ interpretation, the ACT National Curriculum Survey findings indicate teachers need more professional development support to effectively teach the Common Core State Standards, write Kristie Martorelli, Beth Maloney and Tara Dale—award winning Arizona teachers. The standards “mark a huge departure from the old ‘mile-wide, inch-deep’ way of teaching…And those kinds of changes are only effectively achieved through proper support and training.” A RAND study this year found only 28 percent of math and 31 percent of ELA teachers believe professional development training reflect their needs. Another study in Georgia found four in 10 teachers received three days or fewer of training. “It should serve as a wake-up call,” the authors explain, for policymakers to get teachers the support they need.


 

Correcting the Record:

Louisiana under Fire for ‘Tricking’ Residents with Rebranding / Everything-PR
Louisiana officials duped residents by rebranding the “despised” Common Core State Standards as the state’s own learning goals, the article alleges. “Common Core is an education standard from the federal government…In spite of the claims that 20 percent of the original standards had been modified, less than three percent was changed.” The move, the piece argues, will cause residents to lose faith in their state government. “It will take years to undo the damage they have already done.” In fact, Louisiana officials reviewed and continue to build on the Common Core—a smart move considering the outcome of the few states that tried to repeal and replace the standards. Here is where the article gets it wrong:

Like Most States, Louisiana Is Continuing to Build on the Common Core Framework

Louisiana officials duped residents by rebranding the “despised” Common Core State Standards as the state’s own learning goals, an article on the website Everything-PR alleges. “Common Core is an education standard [sic] from the federal government…In spite of the claims that 20 percent of the original standards had been modified, less than three percent was changed.”

The revisions, the piece argues, will subject students to “dumbed down, inappropriate, nationalized and globalized pseudo-education…It will take years to undo the damage they [Louisiana officials] have already done.”

Far from “dumbing down” students, Louisiana’s decision to review, refine and build on the Common Core framework ensures the state’s schools have rigorous and clear learning goals that prepare students for college and careers—a course most states across the country are taking.

“Despite concerted efforts to derail implementation of Common Core State Standards and the high-quality assessments that support them, states have weighed the evidence and opted to build on the framework set by these rigorous, comparable education standards,” Jim Cowen explained earlier this year.

One reason states are sticking with the Common Core is because the standards are built on the best evidence of what students need to know and be able to achieve at each grade level to graduate high school fully prepared for college and careers.

“It is virtually impossible to produce a set of K-12 academic standards that both bear no resemblance to Common Core, and adequately prepare students for college and career,” Karen Nussle wrote last year.

Nussle’s point is borne out by the evidence from the few states that have taken the “repeal-and-replace” route. In the three states that have successfully replaced the Common Core, rewrite efforts have produced either nearly identical learning goals (IN & SC) or academic standards inferior to the Common Core (OK).


 

On Our Reading List:

Congressional Leaders Urge Dept. of Education to Enforce ‘Supplement Not Supplant’ / NBC News
The Congressional Asian Pacific American, Black and Hispanic Caucuses urged the Department of Education to use its regulatory authority to enforce the “supplement not supplant” provisions within the Every Student Succeeds Act. “’Supplement Not Supplant’ will go a long way towards educational equity by ensuring that federal dollars are used to combat educational disparities” said Rep. Judy Chu, chair of the Asian Pacific American Caucus. “The very purpose to Title I is ‘to provide all children significant opportunity to receive a fair, equitable, and high-quality education, and to close educational achievement gaps.’ It is neither fair nor equitable to provide fewer dollars to lower-income students,” the letter to Secretary John King states.

Pruitt: ESSA Plans ‘Stifle Innovation’ / Louisville Courier-Journal
Testifying before the U.S. House Committee on Education and the Workforce Thursday Kentucky education commissioner Kevin Pruitt said the Every Student Succeeds Act contains so many requirements for states it will stifle innovation and impinge on state sovereignty. Pruitt has proposed an “education dashboard” system to measure school performance in Kentucky. “In Kentucky, we found that a summative score leads to ranking and creates an unhealthy sense of competition…It becomes more about adults chasing points and trying to ‘game’ the system to manage the appearance of performance, rather than actual performance.” Pruitt also reiterated concerns he expressed in a letter to Education Secretary John King last month.