COMMON CORE STANDARDS DAILY UPDATE // FEBRUARY 23, 2016

News You Can Use:

Trump Says He’d Kill Common Core. No, He Couldn’t. | Slate
In his Saturday victory speech following his South Carolina win, Donald Trump once again promised to get rid of Common Core, citing a desire to keep “bureaucrats in Washington” from telling parents “how to educate their children.” The article clarifies that, “Common Core wasn’t cooked up by anonymous Washington automatons; it was developed by governors and state education commissioners, then passed by a total of 42 state legislatures, along with the District of Columbia and four territories.”  In a recent memo, Karen Nussle says the Common Core State Standards are a “non-issue” in the presidential race. Most candidates’ “complicated relationship with the standards marked by inconsistencies and shifting positions…explain the difficulty candidates have in scoring a clean hit on the topic of Common Core, and why, in turn, early predictions about the political toxicity of the issue never quite materialized.”

Common Core Tests Assess Student Achievement Differently | U.S. News & World Report
A recent study from the American Institutes for Research showed that “varying scores for what tests consider college and career ready are often not nearly as rigorous as those used by the national exam administered to students across the U.S.” While there are still discrepancies, according to Achieve’s newly released analysis, over half of states narrowed their Honesty Gap, and 18 states narrowed discrepancies by 10 points or more in both fourth-grade reading and eighth-grade math. Studies such as the recently released AIR report are useful, but as Mike Petrilli, president of the Fordham Institute, wrote, while results from new tests are “sobering,” they are “finally giving parents, educators and taxpayers an honest assessment of how our students are doing.”

Common Core’s Happy Days May Be Here Again | Huffington Post
Several recent studies “related to the Common Core could prompt a wary public to give the standards a second look.” Much of the criticism against the Common Core has been informed by incomplete or misleading information and as former Education Secretary Bill Bennett explains, “Myths, exaggerations and hysteria about what the Common Core means and does have dominated the ‘debate’ and the real issues have been obscured.” Recently, however, rhetoric is giving way to more constructive evaluation and “early reports suggest that the new standards are higher and deeper than what states had before.”

Opting Out Is the Wrong Choice for Our Kids | Huffington Post
Charles Coleman Jr., a civil rights attorney, outlines how vital tests are to the civil rights community, stating that “boycotting standardized tests may seem like a good idea, but hurts black learners most.” Coleman goes on to outline that what many critics of Common Core State Standards “often ignore, however, is the high standards and academic rigor that are often reinforced through the system and the accountability that results for teachers and schools.” This viewpoint is echoed in a joint statement from 12 civil rights groups, which details how “reliable data provided by annual statewide assessments” help parents and community members advocate for “better lives and outcomes” for children.

Why are many students with ‘A’ averages being barred from college-level classes? | Hechinger Report
A new study shows that “if community colleges are going to be the new pathway to the middle class, they have a lot of work to do.” Research indicates that “40 percent of students who had an A average in high school were placed into remedial classes.” A report released by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), the Association of Community College Trustees (ACCT) and Higher Ed for Higher Standards shows that some community colleges are already working to close these gaps, and encourages others to institute increased “precollege intervention to help students speed up and catch up.”


Correcting the Record:

How Common Core Ended the Bush Dynasty | Townhall
Common Core opponent Phyllis Schlafly writes that Donald Trump was “right to foresee that Common Core would ‘kill’ any chance of returning the Bush family to the White House.” Schlafly goes on to state that as “Common Core became toxic, Jeb Bush made a too-little, too-late attempt to rebrand the same ideas under a new name,” ultimately derailing his presidential campaign. Here’s where she gets it wrong: http://forstudentsuccess.org/common-core-state-standards-a-non-issue-in-presidential-race/


On Our Reading List:

How Common Core Ended the Bush Dynasty | Townhall
Common Core opponent Phyllis Schlafly writes that Donald Trump was “right to foresee that Common Core would ‘kill’ any chance of returning the Bush family to the White House.” Schlafly goes on to state that as “Common Core became toxic, Jeb Bush made a too-little, too-late attempt to rebrand the same ideas under a new name,” ultimately derailing his presidential campaign. Here’s where she gets it wrong: http://forstudentsuccess.org/common-core-state-standards-a-non-issue-in-presidential-race/